projects

Duke of Edinburgh kayaking and seabird survey

Activity

Six young people are attemtping to circumnavigate the island in kayaks over 2 x 3 days in June/July 2016. In those times they will complete a practice and an assessed kayak expedition. They will also complete a survey of seabirds in their breeding season.

The purpose of the project is to firstly assess the young people's skills in kyaking with a pass being essential for completion of their Duke of Edinburgh award. Also to monitor, identify and record seabirds and their habitats during the breeding season on or near the shores of Arran.

The project involves a practice 3 day expedition round one half of the island with full seabird monotoring. Clearly the 6 young people will benefit tremendously from an experience packed with physical, environmental and life skills. Beyond that it is an aspirational challenge for the younger members of the Duke of Edinburgh scheme or indeed any young person considering joining the group. It is also designed as a detailed and methodical seabird and wild foul monitoring exercise that will benefit a range of stakeholders. A seabird conservationist is training the group in the knowledge and skills they require and will help them produce a report with digital imagery after the expedition.

          

Outcome

- A digital record of the students expedition to share with other young people aspiring to learn to kayak.

- A digital report and presentation to all stakeholders on the seabird and wildfoul monitoring snapshot that this project will provide.

- An article available to all sponsors for their own PR options. 

- An article available to all sponsors for their own PR options.    

- An article on the Arran Duke of Edinburgh website with images.

- Coverage by the banner newspaper (subject to confirmation).

By working closely with a seabird conservationist the group aim to produce a snapshot report of the seabird species diversity on the island during breeding seasons. They will also include any behavioural and habitat notes on the occasion that they are near enough to shore to see. Ongoing monotoring of seabird populations on the island is an important conservation issue as seabirds and people must be able to live side by side. Some of the information might be sensitive eg. precise locations of specific breeding colonies but that will be shared with responsible partners such as Arran Bird Group and charities such as COAST, RSPB and the Scottish Wildlife Trust. This survey work responds to the biodiversity needs of seabird research on the island.      

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